Slavery

Did you know?
She was loved.
Back home,
She was loved,
Even though
She was hungry.

Coming to America,
On the cruise ship
With the rich people
Manman promised her
That life would be
Favorable.
She was one of the
Fortunate ones
To go to this land
Where everyone
Goes to school
And
Everyone
Learns to read.

Now, she doesn’t yet know what a school is,
For she doesn’t go to one
In this land
Where everyone
Goes to school.

She doesn’t read
In this land
Where everyone
Learns to read.

She does dishes,
She smiles and pretends,
She folds the clothes,
She gets slapped,
She wakes the children,
She fixes the breakfast,
She vacuums, irons, washes, dusts.
She gets locked in her cubby.

Did my manman know? she wonders
Did she really know?

Image from subscription clipart service for Iowa schools.

What’s in the Hand of A. Lincoln?

Kate, thanks for the mini writing assignment and virtual field trip. I enjoyed visiting the Met. I have hands on my mind lately, so I stopped at this picture of a cast of Abraham Lincoln’s hand.

What’s in the hand of A. Lincoln?
a bucket handle carrying family food,
an ax splitting rails to make fences,
a ring–should he or shouldn’t he? Love is eternal,
a disarray of papers in a stovepipe hat,
the cold hands of Willie and Eddie, too soon gone,
a farewell speech from Springfield before his inaugural journey,
a pen promising freedom for the slaves in the south,
a needle and thread to stitch together a torn up nation.

“Abraham Lincoln” photo by Cliff, shared with CC BY 2.0 license on Flickr.

The Dancer

Dancer

The Dancer

Crimson red bands of satin

draping the stretched taut muscles—

delicate, yet strong.

Head back, left arm touching heaven

while keeping her pliant hold on earth.

Dancer flying free,

leaping in line with the velvety burgundy suede below.

She lands so softly, like a sleek and slender cat,

hushing the whisper of the ribbons.

A brief moment of silence,

then the gasps and the glory—

the reward from the crowd fills the hall.

She smiles and bows,

Content for a while longer

to remain earthbound.

By Mrs. Krebs